stonecroftcanecorso.com

StoneCroft Cane Corso
Italian Mastiff
~ athletic mastiff ~ working molosser ~ personal guardian ~ family pet ~

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Questions about procedures at StoneCroft....

How long have you been breeding the Cane Corso?  I purchased my first Corso, Gus, in 1996. Within, weeks of that, we acquired our first adult female.  I have since visited many breeders in the United States, as well as, in Italy.  I have acquired a wealth of information on the breed, as well as, books and videos.  I continue to aquire my breeding dogs from around the world.  Preferring to use import bloodlines. I have purchased from Italy, Germany, Canada, and Russia. 

Do you have a health guarantee?
Yes, click her to review my contract.
Contract

What are your prices?
$2000 for a pet puppy.  $2800 for a breed quality pup(with show potential).  The puppies in the litter that come the closest to the breed standard for head type are the pups that are available as breed quality. Other physical factors are considered. Breeding or showing is not a requirement.  After 20 years of breeding the Cane Corso, I am able to make an educated guess on the head type when the litter is about 6-7 weeks old.  The puppies are not sold as show quality because it is impossible to predict the bite at such a young age.    It is similar to looking at your beautiful 2 year old son or daughter and trying to predict if he/she will need braces one day.  The puppies with great conformation are sold as breed quality(with show potential).

The deposit is $100 and is non-refundable. 

What is the cost of ear cropping?  I only do ear cropping on the pups I'm keeping, unless you purchase the training option.  Training the pup for puppy obedience, crate training, and ear cropping is an additional $1000 for Training and $450 - $600 for ear cropping. The pup is with me for 4 to 6 weeks for the training.

If you choose to crop the pups ears, the cost is usually $450 - $650.   Whether or not you choose to do it is up to you. It is not a requirement for show dogs.  If you decide to crop, use a Veterinarian that crops ears often, regardless of the breed.  Take along some pictures of your favorite crop and a print out of this ear crop page and you shouldn't have any problems.    Ear Cropping Page

Is the tail docked and are the dewclaws removed?
Yes, the tail is docked a few days after birth.  The dewclaws on the back legs are removed if present.

Does the puppy receive any shots before shipment?
Yes, the pups receive a immunization shot at 6, 9, & 12 weeks old. 

How are your dogs registered?
We register with AKC.  The Cane Corso received full AKC recognition in July of 2010.  In the past I registered with FCPR (Federation Cynagloque Puerto Rico), but since AKC has accepted the Corsos, that is the only registry I use now.

What is the most important factor you breed for?
I do not strive to produce just one factor of the breed, rather the whole dog , all at once.  Dogs with bad temperaments or health issues do not stay in my program.   I am constantly improving upon good looks, good hips, and good athletic ability.  Good temperament is always the top priority.

What type of training do you do?
My dogs have basic obedience training.   They really enjoy it.  I raise my litters around different types of equipment that will improve their confidence towards unstable footing or odd noises. We live in the country and do a lot of hiking and spend a lot of time on the river. 

Are your dogs Champions?
Some of our dogs have received a Championship in the conformation ring.   We learned early that making a dog a Champion doesn't really carry much merit.  Nearly any Corso can be championed after attending enough shows, regardless of their looks or temperament.  Just because a dog has a Championship doesn't make it a well rounded good specimen.  Temperament and health need to be given just as much consideration as their looks. Competing in the Conformation ring can be fun.  A lot of practice goes into preparing for the competition. Some handlers have developed a real art to making a dog look good in the ring.   Champion titles are often acquired because of the skill of a handler, so don't bank on those Ch. initials being an indicator for a superior dog.  Several of our dogs, and the offspring they have produced, are champions, but we would like to stress to you this should not be used as an indicator for a dogs worth. 

As it goes with so many breeds, some breeders get so focused on producing winning show dogs that the essence of the breed is ignored.   The temperament and athleticism of the Cane Corso are the most valuable assets of the breed.  It is what sets them apart from other breeds.   

Do you have any Corsos in the house?
Yes, I do have a Corso in the house.  I generally take turns as to who I bring indoors with me.  The dogs have their own building, which they live very comfortably in.  It has heating and air conditioning.
You can see more of it here:
  dog kennelThey have a huge fenced in yard and get out to play at least once a day, but usually twice.  The pups are born in the house and stay indoors with me for the first 4 weeks. 

What standard do you breed for?
 The Corso has been a farm dog for centuries, breeding 2 dogs for their working ability, NOT LOOKS.  It has only been in the past 15 years that looks has taken the front seat.  Do you want a dog because it is in accordance with diagrams on a piece of  paper?  Please note, that those diagrams are frequently changed. It has been completely absurd to watch the flip-flopping adjustments to the standard regarding the correct bite and eye shape for the corso here in the USA.  Standards should be used as a guideline, especially to those new to the breed.  Now that the breed is fully accepted by AKC, it is hopeful that there will be less changes to the standard.  Although, it is my strongest belief that the breed club in America should have went with the standard from the country of origin, Italy. 

-I breed for strong breed type.  This means I want my offspring to look like a Cane Corso.

- I breed towards the Italian FCI standard but I will always put health and temperament as a priority.    This means if I have a Corso who has excellent health, excellent temperament, excellent type, and excellent pedigree but has the less desired eye color or bite.  I will keep this dog in my breeding program. 

 

My Soap Box Statement:
Breeding greatly oversized Corsos, will reduce the breeds athleticism.  The Cane Corso is the most athletic of the Mastiffs, lets keep it that way.  If you want a huge dog, go with another breed.  Female Corsos generally range from 80 to 110 lbs.  Males 105 to 135 lbs. There are plenty of exceptions, but the bigger they get the less agile they are.  Their endurance is also affected.

 

 


For answers to all your questions on the breed, check out:

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For cool collars and leashes, check out:

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Misty Barker 

804-443-1776
Tappahannock, Virginia
stonecroft@peoplepc.com

P.O. Box 128

CenterCross, VA  22437

USA

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Happy Owners ] [ Puppies Available ] [ Adults Available ] [ Males ] [ Females ] [ Accomplished ] [ Procedures ] [ Corso Facts ] [ Links ] [ Training ] [ Cane Corso Merchandise ]

 

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